Lemurs and Marsupials

I’ve not spoken of my archive much lately. Truth be told I’ve been ignoring it, but for the best reason: I’ve been taking enough photos lately that I’ve been able to be completely distracted by those and not have the time to delve into my archive to clear it all out.

Let’s turn back to the vaults for a bit, and return to a trip I took to Woburn Safari Park over 18 months ago, and last posted about back in January with a look at their monkeys.

At the end of that trip, which was an organised sanctioned photography trip, we were allowed into the lemur pens at feeding time to get up close and personal with the animals.

1/100sec, f/4.5, ISO 640, 95mm
1/100sec, f/4.5, ISO 640, 95mm

It hadn’t been a day of great weather; it had been a grey, rainy day, so the light was dull but at least pretty even. You can see the dullness in the images, which kind of undermines any hope I may have had in passing these off as creatures in their natural habitat, as opposed to a park in Bedfordshire.

1/100sec, f/4.5, ISO 800, 120mm
1/100sec, f/4.5, ISO 800, 120mm

They seemed to like hanging from the ropes in their pen. It might take a moment when you first see this image to figure out which end is which.

1/40sec, f/4, ISO 1000, 70mm
1/40sec, f/4, ISO 1000, 70mm
1/60sec, f/4, ISO 1000, 70mm
1/60sec, f/4, ISO 1000, 70mm
1/125sec, f/4, ISO 1600, 70mm
1/125sec, f/4, ISO 1600, 70mm
1/100sec, f/4.5, ISO 1600, 105mm
1/100sec, f/4.5, ISO 1600, 105mm

If there was any doubt as to how close we were able to get to these creatures, this photograph by my wife should give an indication. One of the small brown ones you’ll see shortly decided to defecate on my camera bag, something else it was able to survive with aplomb, albeit with a bit of a stain on it.

Normally at this sort of point in the post I’d talk about some sort of background of the animals or their biology. But I have no idea about lemurs. They look like a panda has mated with a chihuahua. The only thing I do know is this next animal is a lemur of the ring-tailed variety.

1/50sec, f/5.6, ISO 1000, 300mm
1/50sec, f/5.6, ISO 1000, 300mm

The ring-tailed lemur is, I think, the better known of the lemurs. He is a little more recognisable from this angle.

1/125sec, f/5, ISO 1600, 160mm
1/125sec, f/5, ISO 1600, 160mm

This chap was soon joined by a few of his friends.

1/250sec, f/4.5, ISO 2500, 130mm
1/250sec, f/4.5, ISO 2500, 130mm
1/250sec, f/5, ISO 2500, 135mm
1/250sec, f/5, ISO 2500, 135mm

I love this shot, but I wish I’d had the forethought (and available light) to shoot at a tighter aperture to get more of the faces in focus. This next shot works better in that regard as the lemurs had the decency to keep their heads in the same focal plane.

1/250sec, f/4.5, ISO 2500, 120mm
1/250sec, f/4.5, ISO 2500, 120mm

Also in the pens were some brown lemurs. There’s probably a more technical name for them, but I can’t remember.

1/200sec, f/4, ISO 2000, 70mm
1/200sec, f/4, ISO 2000, 70mm

One of these brown lemurs (lemurus browniae) was missing a front leg. It’s been long enough now that I can’t remember what they said happened to it.

1/100sec, f/5.6, ISO 2000, 240mm
1/100sec, f/5.6, ISO 2000, 240mm

There was also this thing which is, erm… no idea.

1/125sec, f/4, ISO 2500, 70mm
1/125sec, f/4, ISO 2500, 70mm

There was this funny thing too, but I can’t remember what that was called either.

1/320sec, f/5, ISO 2500, 225mm
1/320sec, f/5, ISO 2500, 225mm

Aha! I know what this next one is. It’s a chicken. Well, a rooster.

1/800sec, f/5, ISO 2500, 150mm
1/800sec, f/5, ISO 2500, 150mm

The title of this post also promised some marsupials. After our experience with the lemurs, which also marked the end of the formalities of the day, my wife and I wondered off to see some of the animals that weren’t on the photography field trip. One of them were these guys.

1/160sec, f/4, ISO 3200, 70mm
1/160sec, f/4, ISO 3200, 70mm

At the time I knew what these were. I think they’re wombats or wallabies or baby kangaroos or some such thing. They were great at making eye contact, that’s for sure.

1/200sec, f/4, ISO 3200, 70mm
1/200sec, f/4, ISO 3200, 70mm
1/125sec, f/4, ISO 3200, 80mm
1/125sec, f/4, ISO 3200, 80mm
1/125sec, f/5, ISO 3200, 140mm
1/125sec, f/5, ISO 3200, 140mm

Unless, of course, there was food involved.

1/160sec, f/4, ISO 3200, 70mm
1/160sec, f/4, ISO 3200, 70mm

Now this animal I do recognise. It’s an ostrich. Unless it’s an emu. Probably.

1/320sec, f/4, ISO 3200, 70mm
1/320sec, f/4, ISO 3200, 70mm
1/250sec, f/4, ISO 3200, 70mm
1/250sec, f/4, ISO 3200, 70mm

Someone should really come up with a book or a website that lists animals and what they are or something, because I really struggle with this sort of thing.

This isn’t my last post from this trip to Woburn. The next and final set of images from the trip will contain a more interesting and diverse bunch of animals, but amazingly mostly ones I’m able to recognise and name.

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Related Posts:

The Big Cats of Woburn
The Hawk Conservancy
Monkeys
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2 Comments

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  1. A great set of images. When you’re taking so many photos, or concentrating on a specific project, I find it’s easy to lose track of what images you’ve taken. These may come from a while ago, but they’re still great to see. 🙂

    Like

  2. Thanks CK. As my wife reminded me when she read this post, you can photograph the signs at the pens to remind me what everything is later on, but I rarely remember to do that (although she did on this occasion, but I didn’t think to ask before I published the post).

    Like

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